Plus-Sized Women’s Fashion is Changing the World

It is reported that 68 percent of America’s women fashion shoppers are plus-sized, yet only…

It is reported that 68 percent of America’s women fashion shoppers are plus-sized, yet only a small percentage of the people who actually work in fashion are plus-sized. This has implications for the manufacturing and designing of clothes to suit these sizes. There have long been accusations lodged against the fashion industry that it promotes and caters for a minority (straight sizes) while treating plus-size fashion as second tier.

Now, the fashion industry is slowly responding to this while shoppers flock to plus-size-only brands and stores instead of mainstream stores and brands that were once the default choice for many women shoppers. Many of those women have found fashion plus size companies to cater to a diversity of body shapes that offer a better and more consistent fit.

This also extends to finding and buying underwear. Women have shopped at these specialist stores have detailed their feedback in Brayola reviews to help would-be shoppers learn more before actually shopping at those stores.

What is considered plus-size? In times gone past, women’s fashion was considered only in tall and short sizes of clothing. The industry as a whole largely ignored the plus-sized market – and to their detriment. That has now begun changing with time: being plus-sized was considered a dress size of 18 and above, but now it is regarded as a size 12 and above to include more body types and sizes. The problem with the women’s fashion industry is that it isn’t just the designers of clothes that are slow to respond to the changing shapes of women; it is also social media and other media institutions such as magazines and fashion websites that don’t portray the fashion needs for plus-sized women as they do for straight-sized women shoppers.

The industry is beginning to accept and reach out to plus-sized models, designers, and brands. The majority of American women are a size 14 or above. Plus-sized clothing isn’t about simply adding more material to designs: plus-sized clothing includes different types of clothes for different body types. Some women prefer different styles, have different tastes, and different needs, as with straight-sized women’s fashion. Plus-sized women are still unable to find clothing that comfortably fits them and in their desired style.

With online shopping, it makes it more difficult to find the right size. It is reported that 40 percent of women’s fashion bought online is returned due to sizing faults. Trying to find the right size and the right style is becoming more and more of a problem. The brands and designers that do concentrate on plus-sized clothing for women are creating great trends. There are relaxed dresses, tops, jeans, and shirts in neutral colors. There is also more figure-flattering apparel for tops and blouses to create flirty silhouettes. Shoppers can now find blazers, pantsuits, blouses, and skirts, designed for plus-sized bodies. The big brands that are driving this change are Micheal Kors, Calvin Klein, Rachel Roy, Lucky Brand, Tommy Hilfiger, City Chic, Anne Klein, Levi’s and Jessica Simpson.